Course Catalogue

Programs

Course Catalogue

 

  1. Department of BIBLICAL STUDIES

  2. Department of EDUCATION

  3. Department of ENGLISH

  4. Department of HEBREW

  5. Department of HISTORY

  6. Department of MUSIC

  7. Department of PHILOSOPHY

  8. Department of PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION

  9. Department of PSYCHOLOGY

  10. Department of RELIGION

  11. Department of SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

  12. Department of SPEECH

DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL STUDIES
All Biblical texts and commentaries are studied in the original

BIB 211   The Book of Genesis with Selected Commentaries   3 Credits
The entire Book of Genesis with selections of classical commentaries from Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Rashbam, Nachmanides, Seforno, Netziv, Malbim and Rabbi S. R. Hirsch. Included will be a study of the Aramaic Targum (translation/interpretation) and Aggadic (Homiletic) and Midrashic exposition. Aspects of creation, man’s responsibility in creation, man’s relationship with his Creator and his fellow man, and good and evil are analyzed. The lives of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and Twelve Tribes as the foundation of the Jewish People.

BIB 212   The Book of Exodus with Selected Commentaries   3 Credits
The entire Book of Exodus with selections of classical commentaries from Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Rashbam, Nachmanides, Seforno, Netziv, Malbim and Rabbi S. R. Hirsch. Included will be a study of the Aramaic Targum (translation/interpretation) and Aggadic (Homiletic) and Midrashic exposition. Highlights: Egyptian bondage and Redemption; the Giving of the Torah and the Ten Commandments; legal jurisprudence; the erection of the Tabernacle.

BIB 213   The Book of Leviticus with Selected Commentaries   3 Credits
The entire Book of Leviticus with selections of classical commentaries from Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Rashbam, Nachmanides, Seforno, Netziv, Malbim, Rabbi S. R. Hirsch and Rabbi D. Z. Hoffman. Included will be a study of the Aramaic Targum (translation/interpretation) and Aggadic (Homiletic) and Midrashic exposition. The Divine Service in the Beis HaMikdosh, the Holy Temple, is studied. Included is the study of man’s personal relationship with the Creator and, by extension thereof, man’s relationship with his fellow: parents, spouse, children, friends, and enemies.

BIB 214   The Book of Numbers with Selected Commentaries   3 Credits
The entire Book of Numbers with selections of classical commentaries from Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Rashbam, Nachmanides, Seforno, Netziv, Malbim, and Rabbi S. R. Hirsch. Included will be a study of the Aramaic Targum (translation/interpretation) and Aggadic (Homiletic) and Midrashic exposition. This course examines the development of the Jewish Nation during its forty year sojourn in the Sinai Desert and the lessons to be learned at both the societal and individual levels. The trials and miracles experienced by the Generation of the Wilderness and their transition from life in the wilderness to the Land of Canaan.

BIB 215   Book of Deuteronomy with Selected Commentaries   3 Credits
The entire Book of Deuteronomy with selections of classical commentaries from Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Rashbam, Nachmanides, Seforno, Netziv, Malbim, Rabbi S. R. Hirsch and Rabbi D. Z. Hoffman. Included will be a study of the Aramaic Targum (translation/interpretation) and Aggadic (Homiletic) and Midrashic exposition. The ethical and moral underpinnings of Jewish faith as commanded by G-d and taught by Moses are reviewed. Deuteronomy as Mishnah Torah. Comparison of topics in Deuteronomy with earlier presentations with other books in the Pentateuch. Moses’s grand, final oration and his demise.

BIB 231   The Book of Joshua and Judges with Commentaries   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the commentaries of Rashi, Radak, Abarbanel, the Metsudos, Malbim and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim.

BIB 233   The Book of Samuel, I and II with Commentaries   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the commentaries of Rashi, Radak, Abarbanel, the Metsudos, Malbim and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim.

BIB 235   The Books of Kings, and Chronicles I and II with Commentaries   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the commentaries of Rashi, Radak, Abarbanel, the Metsudos, Malbim and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim.

BIB 237   The Book of Isaiah with Commentaries   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the commentaries of Rashi, Ibn Ezra, the Metsudos, Malbim, and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim.

BIB 239   The Book of Jeremiah with Commentaries   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the commentaries of Rashi, Radak, the Metsudos, Malbim, and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim

BIB 241   The Books of Ezekiel with Commentaries   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the commentaries of Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Radak, the Metsudos, Malbim, and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim.

BIB 243   The Minor Prophets with Commentaries   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the commentaries of Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Radak, the Metsudos, Malbim, and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim.

BIB 311   The Book of Psalms   3 Credits
Selected reading with commentaries examining the major structure and themes of the Psalms. Comparative analysis of Biblical, Prophetic, and Hagiographic treatment of recurrent themes is emphasized.

BIB 315   The Book of Proverbs   3 Credits
Emphasis on the commentaries of Rabbi Saadia Gaon, Rashi, Rabbeinu Yona, Meiri, Vilna Gaon, and the Metsudos. Initial chapters studied verse by verse; later chapters analyzed thematically: preeminence of Torah study: overcoming ht evil inclination; accepting rebuke, the role of the woman; laziness and industry; wealth and poverty; proper and improper speech; friendship; jealousy.

BIB 317   The Book of Job   3 Credits
Authorship and structure of the book. Themes of Job’s Friends in their individual orations. Man’s right to question Divine justice. Suffering as a catalyst for spiritual growth. Emphasis on Talmudical exegesis, and the commentaries of Rashi, Nachmanides, the Metsudos, Malbim, and the contemporary, eclectic commentary of Da’as Soferim.

BIB 319   The Five Megilloth   3 Credits
The entire books of the Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther are studied with comprehensive selections of ancient and modern exegetes and commentators. Aggadic-Medrahic exposition is analyzed.

BIB 333   Medieval Biblical Exegesis   3 Credits
A detailed analytic and comparative study of the lives and works of the leading figures of the Provencal, Spanish, and Northern French Rabbinic Academies.

BIB 343   Biblical Jurisprudence   3 Credits
The philosophy, principles, and applications of Pentateuchal law. Classification and codification of the 613 Commandments.

BIB 347   The Festival in the Bible   3 Credits
A study of the Pilgrim Festivals, Shemini Atzereth, and the High Holy Days in their respective contexts. Comparison between the sequence in Leviticus XXIII and Deuteronomy XVI is made. The historical,  philosophical, and religious significance of each festival is covered.

BIB 353   The Concept of the Covenant in the Bible   3 Credits
An intensive and detailed historic-philosophical examination of the role of the covenant in the Pentateuch from Noah through Moses. Apposite readings in Prophets and Hagiographa are included.

BIB 363   Studies in the Lives of the Patriarchs   3 Credits
The lives and qualities of Abraham, Issac, and Jacob are examined individually and seen as the historical and ideological foundation of the Jewish People.

BIB 373   Philosophical Interpretations of the Bible   3 Credits
Philosophic interpretations of select Pentateuchal texts are examined. Resolution of apparent anthropomorphisms are determined. Topics included are the attributes of G-d, human trial and suffering, the sacrifice, and the concept of holiness.

BIB 398   Seminar: Selected Topics in Biblical Literature   3 Credits
Intensive study and detailed analysis of selected topics in Biblical Literature.

BIB 399   Independent Research in Biblical Literature   3 Credits
Individually supervised reading and research under the guidance of a faculty member culminating in a major essay.


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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

SECONDARY EDUCATION

EDU 101 Introduction to Education   3 Credits
General examination of the historical and philosophical foundations of education. Basic goals, principles, and methods of instructional approaches to the content areas is covered. Observation of elementary and secondary classroom instruction.

EDU 107 Educational Psychology   3 Credits
Theoretical and research findings of psychology pertinent to educational practices is presented and analyzed. Children’s growth and development, and learning processes are explored, and educational and psychological instruments for evaluation of aptitude and achievement.

EDU 201 History of Education   3 Credits
A critical and comparative survey of the development of educational theory and practice from ancient times to the present.

EDU 211 History of Ancient Jewish Education   3 Credits
An analytic examination of the ideals, methods, and development of Jewish education from Biblical times to the close of the Talmudic period.

EDU 307 Educational Psychology   3 Credits
A psychological study of the educational process in human development from childhood through adolescence and into adulthood, and the teacher-student relationship during these progressive stages. Methods of aptitude and achievement evaluation.

EDU 311 Classroom Management in Elementary School   3 Credits
Seminar in teaching, designed to help students be better prepared for their enhanced student teaching experience. This course will also use both quantitative and qualitative research in understanding theories of effective classroom organization and management. Theories will include the Fred Long's PAT (Preferred Activity Time) approach, William Glasser's Choice Theory, and Haim Ginott's Communication and Positive Relation approach. Students will compare and contrast the main elements and application of the three theories defining their common shared elements and the elements that give each approach its individuality. Based on research findings and this reflective inquiry, the students will refine/design proactive systems of classroom organization and management within the contexts of their student teaching placements and selected classroom behavior settings as presented within the seminar. Aspects of classroom rules and procedures, as well as classroom seating designs will be presented.

EDU 315 Literature for Children   3 Credits
An interpretative and critical study of the various genre of literature—including poetry, folk tales, myths, and non-fiction, both classical and modern—for children ages three through twelve is presented. Practice in oral reading and language and concept development.

EDU 321 Principles, Methods, Texts, and Materials in Education   3 Credits A course of study to understand the goals and differing methodology and teaching styles for the instruction and motivation of both elementary and secondary school children. Curriculum development and the evaluation of textbooks and instructional media is emphasized, as are aspects of classroom management.

EDU 325 Differential Instruction in the Mixed Ability Classroom   3 Credits
An exploration of various educational approaches to meet the needs of diverse learners within the same classroom. Adaptation of curriculum and instruction according to learning styles and interests in stressed. The needs of the gifted, the normal learner, the special education student, and the slow student will be evaluated, as will models of intelligence and the role of modalities in learning.

EDU 327 Philosophy of Education   3 Credits
A philosophic inquiry into the nature and purpose of knowledge and education, including the acquisition and transmission of knowledge. The dynamic of the teacher-student relationship is examined, as is the application of educational models in the contemporary classroom.

EDU 341 Teaching of Religion in Elementary and Secondary Schools   3 Credits
A study of the principles, materials, and techniques for teaching religion in elementary and secondary schools; included is the examination of classic and modern instructional approaches. Classroom observations.

EDU 343 Teaching of Arts and Crafts in Elementary and Secondary Schools   3 Credits
A study of the principles, materials, and techniques for teaching arts and crafts in both elementary and secondary schools. Additionally, the use of art as a teaching medium is emphasized. The student will participate in classroom observation and participation in arts and crafts activities.

EDU 345 Teaching of Music in Elementary and Secondary Schools   3 Credits
A study of the principles, materials, and techniques for teaching music in both elementary and secondary schools. Religious and liturgical music and song is studied. Additionally, the use of music as a teaching medium is emphasized. Classroom observations.

EDU 347 Teaching of Home Economics and Dietary Laws in Secondary Schools   3 Credits
A study of the principles, materials, and techniques for teaching home economics and Jewish dietary laws in secondary schools. Extensive demonstrations and applications of pertinent laws and procedures us emphasized. Classroom observations.

EDU 349 Teaching of English   3 Credits
A review of English grammar, the mechanics of written language, and oral language skills will be conducted. The development of the English curriculum and a review of effective teaching methodology will be emphasized. Additionally, students will prepare lesson plans for the teaching of specific skills as well as review and evaluate commercially published materials. Classroom observations.

EDU 351 Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages   3 Credits
An extensive examination of approaches for teaching foreign languages will be analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on the creative use of modern technology for the teaching of language, including multi-media applications and immersion. Students will be expected to develop creative learning situations, pneumonic devices, Power Point presentations and the like, as well as conduct a review of the literature for effective practices for the study and retention of foreign language instruction. Classroom observations.

EDU 353 Educational Psychometrics   3 Credits
A study of the foundations of educational psychometrics and their implication for curriculum development and classroom applications. The 25 sub-tests of The Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery will be studied in depth including test administration, statistical analysis of raw scores and grade/age scoring norms and their implications for learning style and indication for learning disabilities. Additionally, the sub-tests will be studied when grouped into clusters for wide-ranging interpretation and applied analysis.

EDU 355 Nature and Needs of the Special Education Child   3 Credits
A survey course presenting an overview of the issues concerning learning disabilities and other handicapping conditions. Definitions, historical perspectives, assessment procedures, and the nature and needs of learning disabled child will be examined, including considerations for the modification of teaching materials and learning strategies for the special learner in the classroom.

EDU 363 Guidance and Counseling   3 Credits
The role of the guidance counselor and selected theories of counseling. Ethical and legal issues concerning the conduct and role of the guidance counselor. The counselor–client relationship and issues of confidentiality. Guest lecturers will present the dilemmas and challenges that guidance counselors face in every day situations.

EDU 365 Contemporary Social Issues in Education   3 Credits
Current social issues affecting education are analyzed from theoretical, societal and legal perspectives. Issues examined include the extended role of the teacher and the school within the community, child neglect and abuse, families in conflict, peer pressure in the classroom, and the new parent-teacher partnership: advocates or adversaries. Additionally, the issues of student responsibility, and grading schemes and competition are discussed.

EDU 367 The Jewish Day School Movement   3 Credits
The history and development of the Jewish parochial school system in America. This course includes the appreciation and implication of the value of the dual curriculum, as well as a study of the Day School movements objectives, an evaluation of its impact, current educational trends and future implications for growth.

EDU 371  Student Teaching: Elementary School   3 Credits
Student teaching in the elementary school classroom under the direction of a supervising teacher. Frequent consultation sessions with the supervising teacher are scheduled, as well as twice-weekly seminars with the faculty member in charge of the student teacher program. On-going evaluation and review of teaching methods, knowledge of content area material and the integration of content area skills, curriculum planning, classroom discipline and the development of the student teacher’s personal teaching style are examined. Days and hours of student teaching are arranged on an individual basis.

EDU 372 Student Teaching: Secondary School   3 Credits
Student teaching in the secondary school classroom under the direction of a supervising teacher. Frequent consultation sessions with the supervising teacher are scheduled, as well as twice-weekly seminars with the faculty member in charge of the student teacher program. On-going evaluation and review of teaching methods, curriculum planning, classroom discipline and the development of the student teacher’s personal teaching style are examined. Days and hours of student teaching are arranged on an individual basis.

EDU 398 Seminar: Selected Topics in Education   3 Credits
Intensive study and detailed analysis of selected topics in education in general, as well as the student’s area of specialization.

EDU 399 Independent Research in Education   3 Credits
Individually supervised reading and research under the guidance of a faculty member culminating in a formally written and documented research paper or thematic essay.


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DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

ENG 101  Composition I   3 Credits
Extensive practice in expository and argumentative writing based on essays and selections from other forms of literature. A review of English grammar is completed. Emphasis is on clarity of written expression, effective use of vocabulary, and proper and varied sentence structuring. Frequent conferences to review written work are held.

ENG 102  Composition II   3 Credits
A continuation of ENG 101 with emphasis on analytical reading and critical, formal writing. A research paper is assigned. Frequent conferences to review written work are held.

ENG 201  English Literature I   3 Credits
A survey of the development of English literature to the close of the eighteenth century.

ENG 202  English Literature II   3 Credits
A survey of English literature from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present.

ENG 211  Essay Writing   4 Credits
Selected readings and intensive practice in the writing of various essay styles, including the personal, reflective and critical essay. Class discussion of papers and student conferences are conducted.

ENG 213  Short Story Writing   4 Credits
Selected readings in various genres of the short story and intensive practice in creative writing is emphasized. Style, theme and structure of the short story are analyzed. Class discussions and review of submitted student work are held, as are student conferences.

ENG 261  The English Language   3 Credits
A linguistic study of the structure of the English language. Phonemics, morphology and syntax, and applied linguistics are emphasized. Linguistic theories are compared, as are theories of the acquisition of language.

ENG 271 History of the English Language   3 Credits
An etymological and semantic study of the development of the English language from its Anglo-Saxon origins to the present, and its affinities to ancient and modern languages is studied.

ENG 321 Philosophy of Language   3 Credits
An examination of the origin of human speech, including symbol, metaphor, and idiom. The interrelations of thought, logic, environment, experience and culture as determining factors in language development are analyzed.

ENG 398 Seminar: Selected Topics in English Language and Literature   3 Credits
An intensive study and detailed analysis of selected topics in English language and literature.

ENG 399 Independent Research in English Literature   3 Credits
Individually supervised reading and research under the guidance of a faculty member culminating in a major essay or research paper. The student will select the area and scope of thematic research under the direction of the supervising faculty member.


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DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

GSC 101  Astronomy   3 Credits
An introductory course that presents an understanding of the motion of the earth on its own axis; the motion of the earth as it revolves around the sun; the motion of the moon as it revolves around the earth. The history of the telescope and electromagnetic energy, and the constellations and position of the stars. Students are introduced to the physics of electromagnetic energy and the development of devices such as the telescope and the spectroscope.

MAT 201 Calculus I   3 Credits
An introductory course that includes differential calculus and applications of calculus in everyday life.

GSC 211  Introduction to Human Biology   3 Credits
An introductory course that explores the human anatomy and physiology. Structure, function and homeostaic relationships between the body systems are emphasized.

MAT 225 Applied Statistics   3 credits
This course introduces students to the different methods used in organizing and analyzing data. Students will understand the appropriate tools for drawing inferences from these data. Topics include: Introduction to Statistics; Frequency Distributions; Measures of Central Tendency; Variance and Standard Deviation; Z-Scores; Probability; Distribution of Sample Means; Hypothesis Testing; t Statistics; Correlation; Regression.

GSC 229 The History of Computing   3 Credits
An overview of the evolution of computers and information systems, from the abacus to the microcomputer. The student will examine the evolution of computing machinery, software, programming languages, and be introduced to the men and women who contributed to the growth and development of computing science. Class discussions will place the development of computing within an historical context.

GSC 231  Environmental Science   3 Credits
An introductory course designed to stimulate interest in current scientific and technological developments in Environmental Science. An overview of concepts and methods of the various branches of the physical and life sciences and their interrelationship in explaining natural phenomena is presented. Topics include an historical perspective of atomic structure; land, air and water pollution; solid waste disposal; the greenhouse effect; global warming and other current topics of scientific interest.

GSC 237 Science of Nutrition   3 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of nutrition. Concepts from Biology, Chemistry and Physiology are studied as the basis for exploring the role of nutrition in health. Topics include: Basic concepts of nutrition; U.S. Guidelines for choosing a healthy diet; Reading food labels; Tools for planning an appropriate diet; The relation of nutrition to the function of the body system; CHO (carbohydrates) – types of CHO, usage and benefits of CHO in the body; Dietary fat – function in the body, various types of fats and their effects ; Protein – function in the body; Vitamins – use and abuse; The role of minerals and water in the body; Problems associated with excessive body fat, strategies to solve these problems; The role of exercise in achieving optimal health; The relationship between lifestyle and dietary needs; The nutritional aspects of food processing, food additives, and food safety.

GSC 311  Human Physiology   3 Credits
A course in the science of human physiology. Topics covered include neuromuscular anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular anatomy and function; hemodymanics and electrophysiology, including a basic understanding of the principles underlying the surface electrocardiogram (ECG). Selected areas of endocrinology include the pituitary, thyroid, pancreatic, adrenal, and reproductive organ systems. Special emphasis is placed upon the scientific method as a tool for uncovering the mechanics of physiologic  processes. Students are expected to gain a basic understanding of the experimental technique and its application to investigating physiologic phenomena.

GSC 314 Human Anatomy and Physiology I   4 credits
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and Human Anatomy and Physiology II are two-semester sequential courses designed for science, health professional and life-science students, with a hands-on laboratory program that explores human anatomy and physiology at a high level of detail, integrated with current clinical applications. Structure, function, and homeostatic relationships between the body systems are emphasized. Students will engage in a detailed in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of specific organs and organ systems. They will explore organ systems by working with precision instruments and dissecting a preserved mammalian specimen. Developmental stages of youth, adulthood, and senescence are emphasized to encourage conceptualization of the human body as a dynamic and continually changing organism.

Topics include orientation of the human body; biochemistry; an overview of the cellular basis of life; developmental and histological aspects of tissues; structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems; basic concepts of neural integration; nervous, sensory, endocrine, reproductive, respiratory, urinary, and cardiovascular systems.

GSC 315 Human Anatomy and Physiology II   4 credits
Human Anatomy and Physiology II is the second semester continuation of GSC 314 with greater emphasis on microscopic structure and clinical applications.


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DEPARTMENT OF HEBREW

HEB 101 Elementary Hebrew I   3 Credits
Elements of Biblical Hebrew grammar including consonant and vowel systems, pronominal and verbal systems, vocalization and accentuation.

HEB 102 Elementary Hebrew II   3 Credits
Biblical Hebrew syntax including tense, parts of speech, noun and verb clauses, syntax of nouns, and simple and complex sentences.

HEB 111 Modern Hebrew Conversation and Composition I   3 Credits
A review of the innovations in modern Hebrew grammar and syntax. An introduction to spoken Hebrew stressing pronunciation and comprehension. Elementary aspects of composition are introduced.

HEB 112 Modern Hebrew Conversation and Composition II   3 Credits
A continuation of HEB I with emphasis on modern Hebrew conversation and the introduction to narrative writing.

HEB 201 Intermediate Hebrew I   3 Credits
Intensive practice in noun and verb formation and conjugation.

HEB 202 Intermediate Hebrew II   3 Credits
Characteristic linguistic features of Biblical, Mishnaic, medieval, and modern Hebrew.

HEB 211 Advanced Modern Hebrew Conversation and Composition I   3 Credits
Reading and interpretation of modern Hebrew texts. Extensive practice in written Hebrew.

HEB 212 Advanced Modern Hebrew Conversation and Composition II   3 Credits
The subtleties of modern Hebrew grammar and style are emphasized. Intensive instruction is given in idiomatic and fluent conversation.

HEB 315 Liturgical Poetry   3 Credits
The Piyyut. Early medieval liturgical poets of Palestine including the “anonymous” liturgists, Rabbis Jose ben Jose, Jannai, and Kallir. The impact of historic and political factors on the literary output of this period is examined. Literary characteristics of Piyyut as formulated by Rabbi Moses Ibn Ezra in his treatise on poetics, as well as by modern scholars. The incorporation of the Piyyut into the Prayer Book is studied. Findings from the Cairo Genizah and their implications for the study of liturgical poetry is highlighted.

HEB 317 Medieval Hebrew Poetry   3 Credits
The literary development and embellishment of liturgical poetry and its spread to new centers of Jewish settlement in North Africa, Spain, Germany, France, and Italy is examined. Representative selections from leading North African and European liturgists are presented with emphasis on the liturgical poems that have been incorporated into the prayer book.

HEB 319 Medieval Hebrew Poetry in Spain   3 Credits
Historical and cultural background for this “Golden Age of Spanish Jewry” under the enlightened rule of the Moorish Caliphs is examined. Themes, forms, genres, and rhetorical devices of these complicated and poetic expressions are studied. Analysis of Arabic meter and rhyme, and its adaptation to the Hebrew poetry  of this period is emphasized. Selections from the works of Rabbi Menachem Ibn Saruk , Dunash Ibn Labrat, Samuel HaNaggid, Isaac Ibn Giat, Moses Ibn Ezra, and Abraham Ibn Ezra are presented.

HEB 323 Poetry of Rabbi Solomon Ibn Gabirol and Rabbi Judah Halevi   3 Credits
The works of Rabbis Solomon Ibn Gabirol and Judah Halevi as epitomizing the form and content of the Hebrew-Spanish school of writing is presented. Kether Malchuth and a selection of their respective poems are studied, as well as parallel readings from the Kuzari.

HEB 333 Literature of the Haskalah   3 Credits
A brief survey of the early poetry of the Enlightenment is Western Europe (1750-1880) is presented. Themes and styles of the early period developed and refined by the poets of Eastern European Enlightenment writers (1880-1924) are analyzed. The ideological crises of the poets of the Enlightenment as reflected in their poetry is presented, as well as the conflict between religious and secular values.

HEB 341 Modern and Contemporary Hebrew Poetry   3 Credits
Literary elements of modern poetry is presented. A survey of the works of the secularist poets of the Palestinian (1920-1947) and Israeli (1948 - present) periods are studied. Thematic and stylistic comparisons with their predecessors of the Haskalah is made. The trend away from nationalistic-particularistic style to universalistic poetry is examined.

HEB 342 Modern and Contemporary Hebrew Prose   3 Credits
Literary elements of prose writing is presented. Selected essays form the foremost traditional writers and critics are studied. These include: Girsht, Kariv, Levine, Prager, and other distinguished contributors to the classic literary journal Beth Jacob.

HEB 347 Literature of the Holocaust   3 Credits
Emphasis is placed on the poetry of Uri Zvi Greenberg, and in particular on his collection, R’chovoth Hanahar. Additional selected pieces in prose and drama are drawn from an extensive body of work by various authors.

HEB 363 The Modern Hebrew Short Story   3 Credits
Introduction to the elements of the short story is made. A detailed analysis of selected short stories and a comparison of the techniques of the Hebrew short story and those in other languages is examined.

HEB 375 The Works of S. J. Agnon   3 Credits
An intensive study of selected short stories, novelle, and novels by the Nobel Prize winning author. Agnon’s stylistics, with special attention to the use of Biblical and Mishnaic language and symbolism is examined. The historic and sociological background of the stories set in the European shtetl and in Jaffa is studied. Agnon’s use of modern literary techniques compared with those employed by modern European writers, especially Kafka, is explored.

HEB 398 Seminar: Selected Topics in Hebrew Literature   3 Credits
An intensive study and detailed analysis of selected topics in Hebrew literature.

HEB 399 Independent Research in Hebrew Literature   3 Credits
Individually supervised reading and research under the guidance of a faculty member culminates in a major essay or research paper that is presented and discussed.


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DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

HIS 101   Western Civilization I   3 Credits
A survey course of Western ideas and institutions through the Renaissance period that emphasizes the material and cultural development of Western culture from the Greco-Roman civilization through the medieval and Renaissance periods.

HIS 102   Western Civilization II   3 Credits
A survey course of Western ideas and institutions from the Renaissance period to the present. The religious, political, economic and social development of Western Culture and their interplay between the countries of Europe and beyond are examined, including implications for the present day alliances and relationships between the major world cultures.

HIS 201   Ancient Jewish History   3 Credits
A survey of Jewish history from the Second Commonwealth to the close of the Talmudic period.
(352 BCE  - 500 CE)

HIS 202   Medieval Jewish History   3 Credits
A survey of Jewish history from the Gaonic Period through the Spanish Expulsion.
(600 - 1492)

HIS 203   Modern Jewish History   3 Credits
A survey of Jewish history from the early sixteenth century through World War II.

HIS 221 American History I   3 Credits
A survey of American history from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War.

HIS 222 American History II   3 Credits
A survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present.

HIS 285 From Waterloo to World War I: Britain in the Long Nineteenth Century, 1815-1918   3 Credits
An overview of the major political, social, and cultural events, achievements and personages of the period. The focus will be on domestic affairs, with special attention given to the evolution of reformist sentiment, the growth and development of political parties, and the decline of the aristocracy. The prominent political figures of that time will be presented: Russel, Palmerston, Gladstone, Disraeli, and Chamberlain.

HI S311 America in the Era of the Revolution: 1763-1815   3 Credits
An overview of the political, religious, racial and material origins of the formative period in American history, from the aftermath of the French and Indian Wars to the War of 1812 against Great Britain. In addition, the course will examine the political, geographic and social consequences of the Revolution, specifically the establishment of a framework for deferral government, westward expansion, and the incipience of industrialization.

HIS 312   Studies in American Jewish History   3 Credits
Extensive study of the cultural development of the Jews in America from the Colonial period till World War I. Emphasis on the issues of immigration, settlement, acculturation, the development of the Jewish community, and the role of the Jew in intellectual life in America.

HIS 315   Studies in Contemporary World Jewish History   3 Credits
The destruction of the Jewish centers of settlement and learning during the Holocaust and their subsequent transplantation to America and Israel; the creation and development of the modern State of Israel; the recurrence of anti-Semitism and its consequences; and the plight of Jews behind the Iron Curtain.

HIS 319   History and Growth of the Modern State of Israel   3 Credits
Issues studied in this survey course include the Chovevei Zion movement and its ideology, the early Russian and European migrations to Palestine, reclamation of the land and the development of the various agrarian settlements, Palestine under the British Mandate, Aliyah Bet immigration movements and the War for Independence, the unique social, economic, political, and military developments in the modern State of Israel, and the growth and impact of the religious community.

HIS 321 The Civil War: Transformation of American Society   3 Credits
The Civil War as it redefined the nature of society and the vision of the country from a loosely bound group of agrarian states on a single coast of a great continent to a unified country that spanned the vast expanse from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean.

HIS 343 Sects in Judaism During the Second Temple   3 Credits
The Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes and other sects, including the evaluation of their religious beliefs and controversies, and their resultant effects, both immediate and long range are studied.

HIS 353 European Political History   3 Credits
Focus on the development of the theory of citizen and state from the fall of the Roman Empire through to the development of a mature multi-state political system is covered. Significant events will include the rise of the Carolingian monarchy and the creation of the Holy Roman Empire, the investiture controversy, the Crusades, the conflict between emperor and papacy, and the growth of the concept of a post-feudal state forged from the Hundred Years War.

HIS 355   Studies in Medieval Jewish History   3 Credits
The migration of Jewish populations at the close of the Gaonic Period (1050) from Babylon to Western Europe and North Africa is examined, as is their religious, cultural, political, and economic activity under  Christian and Islamic rule. History of Ashkenazic Jewry, including Crusades, blood libels, expulsions from England and France, burning of the Talmud. History of Sephardic Jewry, including Golden Age of Spain, Inquisition and expulsion from Spain. Great Jewish personalities of this period.

HIS 361 History of the Hasidic and Mithnagdic Movements   3 Credits
A study of the leading proponents of both approaches to Judaism within the Orthodox camp, and their ideologies and conflicts are examined, as well as the effect of those issues upon orthodox Judaism today.

HIS 367   The Era of the Reform Movement   3 Credits
This course examines the development of the Reform Movement as a reaction to the modernization, industrialization, and secularization of the 18th century. The clash between faith and the Age of Reason. Philosophical tenets of the Reform Movement and how they have evolved until the present. The Positive-Historical School as a reaction to Reform, its philosophy and how it has evolved until the present. Wissenschaft des Judentums as the intellectual core of Reform and Conservative Judaism.

HIS 369   Origins of Contemporary Movements in Judaism   3 Credits
A study of the movements formed in response to the challenges of the Modern Age: Hassiduth, Mussar, Torah Im Derekh Eretz; lives and writing of their founders and leaders.

HIS 373   Intellectual History of the Jews   3 Credits
The main ideas, institutions, and currents of thought in the context of ancient medieval and modern Jewish culture are examined from religious, philosophic, political, and social perspectives. Implications for contemporary Jewish thought and life is explored.

HIS 377   Contemporary Issues in Modern Jewish Society   3 Credits
Demographic patterns with emphasis on trends of assimilation and inter-marriage, including inter-faith and inter-racial relationships is analyzed. The correlation between Jewish education and Jewish identity is studied.

HIS 398   Seminar: Selected Topics in Jewish History   3 Credits
An intensive study and detailed analysis of selected topics in Jewish history is conducted.

HIS 399   Independent Research in Jewish History   3 Credits
Individually supervised reading and research is conducted under the guidance of a faculty member, culminating in the presentation of a major essay or research paper.


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DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy   3 Credits
Introduction to the basic methods of philosophical analysis. Topics include  theories of knowledge and fundamental issues raised by religion, natural science and the social sciences. Readings in major classical and modern philosophic works.

PHL 111 Philosophy of Man   3 Credits
A study of the complex nature of man, including the vegetative, sentient, imaginative, appetitive, and rational facilities. The harmony between man and the universe, his purpose in life, and the immortality of his soul.

PHL 201 Principles of Moral Philosophy   3 Credits
Fundamental principles of good and evil, and duties and rights in the context of man’s classical quest for truth. The concepts of absolute and relative as they apply to immorality.

PHL 211 Introduction to Ethics   3 Credits
Representative views regarding the classical problems of good and evil, Divine Providence and free will, the individual vis-à-vis society, moral value judgments, and the nature of human happiness.

PHL 223 Aesthetics   3 Credits
The philosophy of beauty and its various expressions; the concepts of absolute and relative in the aesthetic experience.

PHL 231 History of Jewish Philosophy I   3 Credits
A survey of the lives and works of representative Jewish philosophers from the Tanaitic period through Maimonides. (100 BCE - 1204 CE)

PHL 232 History of Jewish Philosophy II   3 Credits
A survey of the lives and works of representative Jewish philosophers from Nachmanides through Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato. (1190 - 1745)

PHL 311 Medieval Jewish Philosophy   3 Credits
Selections form the works of Rabbis Israeli, Saadia, Ibn Gabirol, Pakuda, HaLevi, Ibn Ezra, Maimonides, Gersonides, Crescas, and Albo.

PHL 321 Philosophy of Language   3 Credits
An examination of the origin of human language (including symbol, metaphor, and idiom), and the interrelationship of thought, logic, and culture as determining factors in language. *(This course is identical with ENG 321)

PHL 323 Philosophy of Religion   3 Credits
The definition of religion and its fundamental concepts; theology examined in terms of reason, faith, and experience; proofs for the existence of  G-d and the immortality of the soul; the relationship between science, philosophy, and religion.

PHL 325 Philosophical Foundations of Judaism   3 Credits
A philosophical approach to the basic tenets of the Jewish faith. Concepts included are: the unity, incorporeality, omniscience, omnipotence, and omnipresence of G-d; creatio ex nihil;Divine origin of the  Torah, the Messiah, resurrection of the dead, and Divine retribution.

PHL 327 Philosophy of Education   3 Credits
A philosophic inquiry into the nature and purpose of knowledge and education; the acquisition and transmission of differing kinds of knowledge; the concept of teacher and student and their relationship; the application of educational theory to the contemporary  classroom. *(This course is identical with EDU 327)

PHL 329 Advanced Ethics   3 Credits
Tractate Avoth with selections from the commentaries of Rashi, Maimonides, Rabbi Jonah Girundi, Rabbi Obadiah of Bartenura, Maharal, and Tosephot Yom Tov.

PHL 331 The Philosophy of Rabbi Saadia Gaon   3 Credits
Beliefs and Opinions with commentaries. Emphasis on the relationship between revelation (faith) and reason (knowledge), and the categorization of the commandments of the Torah.

PHL 333 The Philosophy of Rabbi Bachya Ibn Pakuda   3 Credits
Selected readings from Rabbi Pakuda’s ethical treatise, Duties of the Heart, with commentaries.

PHL 335 The Philosophy of Rabbi Judah HaLevi   3 Credits
The Kuzari with commentaries.

PHL 337 The Philosophy of Maimonides  3 Credits
Introduction to Ethics and selections from Mishnah Torah, Guide for the Perplexed, and Responsa.

PHL 339 The Philosophy of Rabbi Jonah Girundi   3 Credits
Gates of Repentance with commentaries.

PHL 355 The Philosophy of Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato   3 Credits
Selected readings from Rabbi Luzzato’s ethical/philosophical volumes The Path of the Just, The Way of the L-rd, and The Tower of Strength.

PHL 363 Modern and Contemporary Jewish Philosophy   3 Credits
Major Jewish philosophers and philosophic movements from Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch to the present day. Current philosophical issues in the light of traditional Jewish thought.
(1840 - to the present)

PHL 373 Philosophical Interpretations of the Bible   3 Credits
Philosophic interpretations of select Pentateuchal texts analyzed, and the resolution of apparent anthropomorphism are made. Topics include the attributes of G-d, human trial and suffering, the sacrifice, and the concept of holiness. *(This course is identical with BIB 373)

PHL 375 Metaphysics   3 Credits
A study of the first principles of knowledge and the nature of being as treated in classical and modern sources. Critical examination of agelong philosophical problems is undertaken.

PHL 376 History of Epistemological Thought   3 Credits
This course examines the origins and subsequent evolution of the modern epistemology of the western canon, beginning with the pre-Socratic philosophers. Special emphasis will be placed on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle and their influence on all subsequent Western thought. The role of the fall of Rome, the medieval period, and the fall of Moorish Spain are examined as they lead to Aristotelian scholasticism and the neo-Pythagorean challenge. The course ends with Bacon and the rise of an inductive epistemology culminating with Newton.

PHL 377 Reason, Revelation, and Faith   3 Credits
An intensive examination of the relationship between Reason, Revelation, and Faith is undertaken as formulated by the major Jewish philosophers. These concepts are considered as they determine man’s comprehension of various levels of reality.

PHL 383 Contemporary Moral Problems   3 Credits
The role of classic philosophic theories as applied in the understanding and solving of moral issues in contemporary society is examined. Moral relativism and absolutism are analyzed.

PHL 398 Seminar: Selected Topics in Philosophy   3 Credits 
The intensive study and detailed analysis of selected topics in philosophy.

PHL 399 Independent Research in Philosophy   3 Credits
Individually supervised reading and research under the guidance of a faculty member culminating in the presentation of a major essay or research paper.


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DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION

PHE 101 Introductory Physical Education, Part One   2 Credits 
A program of basic physical education designed to expose the student to a variety of recreational activities and sports such as gymnastics, folk dancing, swimming tennis, volleyball, and softball.

PHE 102 Introductory Physical Education, Part Two   2 Credits 
Continuation of course PHE 101.

PHE 201 Applications of Physical Education, Part One   2 Credits 
A thorough study of the rules, techniques and dynamics of group sports as applicable to activities taught in PHE 101 and 102.

PHE 202 Applications of Physical Education, Part Two   2 Credits 
Continuation of PHE 201.

PHE 211 Health Education I   3 Credits 
Fundamentals of metabolic processes and personal hygiene are presented. Additional topics include the physiology and mechanics of exercise and fatigue, first aid training, and nutrition. Special attention is given to the psychological and social issues related to dieting, weight loss and self-image, mental health, and stimulants, narcotics, and drugs as a cultural phenomena. Students are offered the opportunity to discuss individual health issues with professional health providers.

PHE 212 Health Education II   3 Credits 
Basic principles of family and community health and sanitation are presented. Topics include environmental health issues, disease prevention and control, and local, national and international problems in public health and the agencies involved.

PHE 321 Child Development and Health   3 Credits 
Physical growth and development from the prenatal period to maturation and adulthood is studied.


DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 229   General Psychology   3 Credits
Introduction to psychology as the science and study of human behavior. Physiological foundations and the integration of cognitive, sensory, perceptual, and motivational aspects of learning are explored. Various models of intelligence are discussed.

PSY 231   Child Psychology   3 Credits
A study of physiological and psychological child development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The influences of heredity, society, and environmental stimulation of cognition and personality, and social growth and maturity are examined.

PSY 235   Developmental Psychology   3 Credits 
The student is provided with an in-depth understanding of the psychology of growth and development of human beings throughout their lives. The interrelationship of physical, intellectual, emotional, experiential, and social aspects of human development is examined.


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DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION

REL 101 Introduction to Jewish Law I   3 Credits 
A survey of the major laws of Judaism with emphasis on laws of the prayers and blessings.

REL 102 Introduction to Jewish Law II   3 Credits
A survey of the major laws of Judaism with emphasis on laws of the Sabbath and Festivals.

REL 201 Advanced Jewish Law I   3 Credits 
A detailed study of the Jewish dietary laws, laws of charity, and laws pertaining to Jewish family life.

REL 202 The Jewish Legal System   3 Credits 
The modus operandi of the Jewish legal system. Methodology and procedures of tracing the Halacha through primary and secondary sources.

REL 211 Liturgy I   3 Credits 
Origin and development of the Prayer Book. Detailed analysis of daily and Sabbath prayers.

REL 212 Liturgy II   3 Credits 
Adaptation of Temple ritual to the synagogue; synagogue ritual, including the apportionment of Torah and Prophetic readings.

REL 223 Jewish Festival Liturgy   3 Credits 
Detailed analysis of Festival, High Holy Day, and Fast Day liturgy. Sacred hymns for special occasions. The Passover Haggadah.

REL 323 Philosophy of Religion   3 Credits 
The definition of religion and its fundamental concepts; theology examined in terms of reason, faith, and experience; proofs for the existence of G-d and the immortality of the soul; the relationship between science, philosophy, and religion. *(This course is identical with PHL 323)

REL 327 Philosophy of Prayer   3 Credits 
Philosophic examination of the nature of communication between man and G-d. The facets of prayer: acknowledgment, solicitation, and self-evaluation.

REL 333 Psychology of Religion  3 Credits 
A psychological examination of the nature and needs of man as expressed in the phenomenon of religion.

REL 343 Biblical Jurisprudence   3 Credits 
The philosophy, principles, and application of Pentateuchal law. Classification and codification of the 613 commandments.
  * (This course is identical with BIB 343)

REL 345 Philosophical Interpretations of Jewish Law   3 Credits 
Derivation of philosophical concepts from Jew law; Halacha as the matrix of Jewish philosophy and philosophic methodology.

REL 355 Sociology of Religion   3 Credits 
The role of religion in defining social relationships within the family, society, and major institutions of society; religion as a formative influence on culture.

REL 367 Studies in Contemporary Jewish Religious Life   3 Credits 
Major Jewish religious institutions and organizations and their ideologies; contemporary religious issues concerning in the areas of government, education, science, and medicine.

REL 398 Seminar: Selected Topics in Religion   3 Credits 
Intensive study and detailed analysis of selected topics in Religion.

REL 399 Independent Research in Religion   3 Credits
Individually supervised reading and research under the guidance of a faculty member culminating in the presentation of a major essay or research paper.


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DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH

SPE 101 Voice and Diction   3 Credits 
The fundamental principles of voice, articulation, diction, style and delivery are presented. Practice in conversational, interpretative, and public speaking is emphasized. Students are expected to make prepared and extemporaneous oral presentations to the class.

SPE 201 Public Speaking   3 Credits 
A study of and extensive practice in various speaker-audience relationships; extemporaneous and impromptu speaking; parliamentary procedure and group dynamics; the use of notes and manuscript in public address.

SPE 301 Argumentation and Debate   3 Credits
Development of critical analysis and the techniques of formal argumentation and debate through intensive topical research and practice in the principles of proposition, evidence, valid inference, rational proof, and cross-examination are presented and applied.

SPE 315 Phonetics   3 Credits
A one-semester course with major emphasis placed on the understanding and practice of phonetic transcription of spoken language using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Topics include the history of phonetic science, experimental and clinical phonetics (use of diacritics), distinctive features and minimal pairs, auditory features of phonemes, anatomy of the speech mechanism, the Vowel Quadrilateral as a schematic representation of the oral cavity and tongue height and advancement for production of vowel phonemes, and dialectic variations in multi-cultural populations.

SPE 321 Articulation and Phonological Disorders   3 Credits
This course covers the identification, evaluation, and treatment of phonological and articulation disorders in populations across the life span. Analytical and descriptive skills and  knowledge of theoretical constructs are presented with special focus on their application in childhood phonology. Practice in taking phonemic inventories and basic assessment, and management procedures for culturally and linguistically diverse populations is presented. Field experience will provide opportunities to practice and reflect on normal development, assessment, and interventions principles.

SPE 323   Introduction to Normal language Development   3 Credits 
An overview of the development of language from infancy through adulthood. The distinction between language differences and language disorders is established. Language is discussed in relation to speech, and hearing and communication. Review of the research and theories in the field of linguistics is conducted as an introduction to the in-depth study of the three major domains of language: content, form, and use, and their development and maturation. Transcription and analysis of language samples for phonology, morphology and syntax, and semantics and pragmatics are made. Developmental speech benchmarks are reviewed for their  relationship to cognition, motor, and social-emotional skills as they relate to the nature-versus-nurture paradigm.

SPE 325 Language Disorders   3 Credits 
A variety of language disorders affecting child and adult populations are presented. An extended spectrum covering pediatric and adult communication differences, delays, and disorders are examined in terms of etiology and symptoms. Assessment of these disorders is reviewed with focus on establishing treatment options, treatment plans and appropriate goals for their remediation.

SPE 329 Audiology   3 Credits  
This course provides an overview of the profession of audiology, the physics of sound, anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism, and audiological assessment of the normal and disordered auditory system.

SPE 331 Aural Rehabilitation  3 Credits 
Aural Rehabilitation is a course that examines the effects of hearing loss on communication abilities of children and adults and encompasses assessment, intervention strategies and service delivery models designed to maximize communication skills in all populations across the life span.

SPE 333 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech, Hearing, and Swallowing   3 Credits 
An in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, auditory, laryngeal, and nervous systems as they relate to breathing, phonation, articulation, resonance, hearing, verbal communication, and deglutition.

SPE 335 Speech Science and Acoustics   3 Credits 
An introduction to speech science theory, instrumentation, and measurement with emphasis on the physical properties of sound and resonance, acoustic analyses related to speech perception and production, and clinical applications. Topics include the study of harmonics, vibration, characteristics and measurement of periodic and aperiodic complex tones, frequency, intensity, velocity and spectral wavelength, and respiratory breakdowns that affect the physical parameters of speech production and perception.
 

SPE 339 Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology   3 Credits
An introductory course designed to explore the basic principles of screening, assessment, and diagnosis of communication disorders across all ages and settings.


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MUSIC

MUS 101  Music Appreciation   3 Credits
A survey course that introduces the student to a variety of topics pertaining to classical music, both orchestral and vocal, from the Renaissance Period through the twentieth century. Major composers and their pieces will be presented, with primary focus on the analysis of music based on the Five Elements of Music: melody, harmony, rhythm, color, and form. Larger forms, such as symphony and the concerto are examined in depth, and the evolution of these forms is traced from the Baroque through Romantic periods. Students will learn to analyze single-movement forms such as Sonata Form and Theme and Variations both on paper and through  musical presentations. Time will be devoted to vocal music, both art song and opera. Emphasis is placed on the integration and synthesis of knowledge and musical experiences presented.

 

A degree-granting institution invested with university powers operating pursuant to an act of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, 1968-69